The Latest Mental Health News

We’d firstly like to extend our love and support to all those who lost loved ones in the Grenfell atrocity almost 1 year ago and who have, over the last 2 weeks, displayed courage beyond belief as they remembered, and talked about, those they have lost as the start of the inquiry got underway.

It was heartbreaking listening to the personal stories families told, in their own words, about the deaths of their loved ones.  Worse still were the harrowing & haunting scenes played  to those in attendance.  We ask you  – how do you watch images of the tower as it was engulfed in fire and thick smoke, especially when people can clearly be seen trying, and failing, to escape.

Over and over again it has been the community supporting the community through this horrific nightmare from which they cannot wake up.  The ‘Pen Portraits’ element which the Inquiry began with, was no different.  Reports of survivors holding and soothing each other whilst they re-lived the horror, started on the day of the tragedy and are continuing now.

Physical wounds, to a degree, heal.  Psychological wounds can take much longer and those affected require patience, empathy and understanding.  If you know someone who’s affected and may be traumatised by the fire, then please, if you haven’t already, reach out to them, let them know you’re there and that you care about their mental health.

We have met lots of survivors.  Equally, there are many we haven’t met.  But to them all we’d like to applaud them for their bravery, resilience & support of each other.

SOS Silence of Suicide will continue to support the Grenfell victims for as long as we are needed, in whatever way that help is required.  Please telephone us on 07802 884984 or email

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The tragedy of losing his 2 sons to a speeding car proved simply too much to live with for Reece Platt-May , who was found hanging  in May this year in Greece after the deaths of his boys in February.

Only other parents who’ve lost children can fully understand the impact this has on them and their lives and some just cannot cope with a loss so huge.  A banned driver, fuelled by cocaine should never, ever have been able to get behind the wheel of a car.  His utter selfishness has torn apart an entire family.

Sky News reports that

‘Mr Platt-May had last month attended the sentencing of Robert Brown, a banned driver with 30 related convictions, who had cocaine in his system and was speeding at up to 60mph when he hit the boys.

Brown, 53, who had no insurance or driving licence, had been released from prison six days before the crash and had an extensive criminal record.

He was jailed for nine years after pleading guilty to killing the boys by dangerous driving.

One witness statement read in court had likened Brown’s driving to that of “a madman” who just did not brake in time.’

SOS Silence of Suicide sends their thoughts and love to the Platt-May family and their friends.

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Bristol University in the News Again

Just over a year ago, we were contacted by Bristol University who were experiencing higher than average deaths by suicide amongst their students.

Multiple conversations were had, and after 6 months they decided to implement processes which they hoped would help tackle the student suicide figures..

Having spoken on behalf of other Universities, ie, Huddersfield & Oxford with tremendously positive feedback, we were naturally disappointed but extremely pleased that Bristol University had a strategy in place which they hoped would prove beneficial.

So we’re highly concerned to read just a couple of days ago in The Guardian , that students are becoming increasingly angry at the number of suicides (10 over 18 months, including suspected suicides) and are taking action to make themselves heard, with up to 500 people marching last week to demand change.

We have today written to the University offering our help and support to their students and will update you  as and when we are able.

If you know anyone who studies at Bristol, please ask them to share this post – thank you.

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‘A 24 hour Response Team In Yorkshire is helping to ease the pressure on hospitals and police cells through their First Response Programme, set up 3 years ago and advertised as : ‘First Response was set up by Bradford district care NHS trust three years ago as a 24-hour crisis service offering fast assessment and support for anyone calling its telephone helpline. It gets an average of 6,000 calls a month, fielded by a professional team whose focus is on enabling people to live independently wherever possible.

Some people who use the service just want to talk, but others are in such distress that they require face-to-face assessment and intervention by the intensive home treatment team, which can visit three or four times a day. Rather than turning up in A&E or spending the night in a cell under police section 136 powers to detain them in a place of safety, most people get help tailored to their actual needs.

“Since we started First Response we haven’t had any out-of-area placements and that saved us £1.8m in the first year,” says Grainne Eloi, interim head of mental health services at the trust. “We’ve also made big strides in our relationships with the police. They’ve got a direct line to First Response and four of our nurses have trained as special constables, working alongside the police to avoid using section 136. It has helped the police take a more sympathetic approach.’ (The Guardian 30/5/18)

SOS Silence of Suicide feel this is constructive managment of resources, whilst ensuring the vulnerable and in-need get the right care, when they need it & where they need it.  If anyone’s experienced the First Response protocol in the Bradford area, and wishes to comment on their experience(s), then please get in touch –

 

It’s Time To Stop The Silence

 

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