fbpx









start the conversation

Our lines are open Monday to Friday 8pm to Midnight and Saturday/Sunday 4pm until Midnight.
If our lines are closed, you can always call 999 or 111 or visit the following links:


Peter Devlin

Peter Devlin

Supporter

SOS are delighted to announce that snooker player Peter Devlin has joined our team of Ambassadors.

Peter is 23 and from Leyton in London.

‘Snooker is a passion, an addiction, a way of life. It’s in the blood. And for me, it’s a dream, a future career, and pretty much my life! In 2016, I became the English Under 21 Champion. And since then, I’ve been knocking on the door to turning professional. And that is the next major goal to achieve!

Snooker is one of the most mentally and emotionally challenging sports in the world in my opinion. You’re on your own. And when you’re playing, there is often nothing you can actually do apart from sit and watch the opponent play, while you think about every doubt, worry, fear and negative thoughts about yourself and your life.

You travel long distances alone, sometimes after heartbreaking defeats that not only cost you a lot of money, but also crush your dreams.

You practice hour after hour in quiet lonely clubs, banging your head against a wall trying to improve, but not knowing how.

It can be mental torture. And a lot goes on inside the head of a snooker player.

This is why I support this charity. Because I think it’s very important to talk about your feelings. I believe admitting and opening up is the first stage to helping to beat it.

I do believe suicide is one of the saddest ways to die. Many deaths are unavoidable. But suicide is not. It leaves so many family, friends, and loved ones confused and helpless. It leaves so many unanswered questions and lost souls.

Inside and outside of snooker, I think mental health is something that is definitely getting talked about more. And I support the movement that it should continue to be talked about even more.

No one should be ashamed or embarrassed to talk about their feelings and insecurities’