World Mental Health Day Latest Statistics

On World Mental Health Day, we look at the 2018 suicide statistics, which show a worrying rise in suicides especially amongst middle aged men and young people.  There are things we can do to help tackle the rise, and talking is just one of them.  Today, world mental health day, let’s all take time to talk to each other, especially about our mental health.

Nick Stripe, Head of Health Analysis and Life Events, said:

“We saw a significant increase in the rate of deaths registered as suicide last year which has changed a trend of continuous decline since 2013. While the exact reasons for this are unknown, the latest data show that this was largely driven by an increase among men who have continued to be most at risk of dying by suicide. In recent years, there have also been increases in the rate among young adults, with females under 25 reaching the highest rate on record for their age group.

“Looking at the overall trend since the early 80s, we are still witnessing a gradual decline in the rate of suicide for the population as a whole. We will continue to monitor the recent increase, to help inform decision makers and others that are working to protect vulnerable people at risk.”

Data for Northern Ireland will be  published later this year on the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency website.

The Office for National Statistics website states that:

In 2018, a total of 6,507 suicides were registered in the UK, 686 more deaths than in 2017 when there were 5,821 deaths (11.8% increase). This equates to a statistically significant increase in the suicide rate, with 11.2 deaths per 100,000 population in 2018, compared with 10.1 deaths per 100,000 population in 2017.

Following several years of decline, the latest UK suicide rate has increased to the level seen when it previously peaked in 2013 (11.1 deaths per 100,000). Suicide rates tend to fluctuate on a year-to-year basis. It is therefore too early to say whether the latest increase represents a change in the recent trend.

The factors behind any increase in suicide rates are complex. However, as detailed in Section 3, Things you need to know about this release, a change in the standard of proof used by coroners may have affected the latest figures. The latest provisional figures for England (2019 registrations for Quarters 1 and 2), which are subject to change and not finalised, show similarly elevated levels of registrations in the first half of 2019.

To read the full report click HERE

Stigma, Silence, Shame – It’s Time To Stop The Silence

#WMHD #stopthesilence